Sensuous SM savant Oniroku Dan shuffles off mortal coil at age 79

Tokyo Chunichi Sports May 7
Tokyo Chunichi Sports May 7

Oniroku Dan, author of some 120 works of erotic fiction involving sadism and masochism, about 50 of which were adapted into films — including “Hana to Hebi” (Flowers and Snakes), “Kurobara Fujin” (Madame Black Rose) and “Hakujitsumu” (Daydreaming) — passed away of esophageal cancer at a Tokyo hospital on May 6, the Tokyo Chunichi Sports (May 7) announced. He was 79.

Dan was born Yukihiko Kuroiwa in Hikone City, Shiga Prefecture. He began his career in erotic fiction with contributions to the SM fanzine Kitan Club in 1961.

Coincidentally Dan was also an enthusiastic player of the board game shogi (general’s chess), and held the rank of 6th dan (rokudan in Japanese), but the “Dan” in his pen name was reportedly taken from the late Toho film star Reiko Dan (1935-2003), who he adored; the “oni,” because he said he felt “possessed by a demon” while writing, and “roku” because he was born in the sixth year of the Showa Era (1931).

An English translation of his semi-autobiographical work, “Season of Infidelity: BDSM Tales from the Classic Master,” was published by Vertical in 2010.

Busty bombshell actress Aya Sugimoto, who ecstatically trembled and shuddered under bondage and humiliation in the 2004 and 2005 remakes of Nikkatsu’s erotic 1974 film “Hana to Hebi,” recalled Dan as “a true gentleman, who brimmed over with love and eroticism and humor and genius. He was eminently lovable. I had hoped to work with him again on another picture. And I would have liked to have met him again for drinks.” (K.S.)

Source: “SM shosetsu no chichi Dan Oniroku-san yuku,” Tokyo Chunichi Sports (May 7, page 1)

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