Ear-cleaning sex service briefly waxes, then wanes

Nikkan Gendai August 29
Nikkan Gendai August 29
“Iyashi-kei” (psychological healing) services in which male patrons recline with their heads upon a young women’s lap for a tender session of wax-removal from their auditory canals have become quite common of late.

The pioneer in this game, reports Nikkan Gendai (Aug. 29), dates back to 1992, when Mimi Kaki Club opened in Shinjuku. This innovative esute (aesthetic salon) proved to be way ahead of its time, however, and if you’ll lend us you ears, we’ll fill you in on how this club was quickly drummed out of business.

Mimi Kaki Club charged a heady 20,000 yen for a 60-minute session, of which only the first 10 minutes involved ear-reaming. How it justified such an exorbitant admission fee is readily discernable from the other services it supplied.

First of all, during the ear-job, female attendants made little or no effort to conceal their panties. And this low-down view was merely prelude to the main course, which included oral sex, French kissing and a rim job.

But the shop encountered all kinds of difficulties right from the get-go. For one thing, many male customers didn’t give a hoot about the ear-picking preliminaries and demanded the gals get right down to the nitty-gritty. “Let’s not waste our precious time,” they’d pant impatiently.

Some customers actually did desire an ear-cleaning. But the attendants were not particularly well trained at the task, and many proved to be outright incompetent.

The fault, however, was not always the attendant’s; she might be concentrating conscientiously on her work when a customer would reach out and paw at her breast or some other erogenous zone, causing her to jerk spasmodically at the worst possible time, thereby jamming a bamboo mimikaki-bo deeply into the prone customer’s ear to produce a scream of agony.

Some customers went so far as to claim that their eardrums had been ruptured.

“Your girl wrecked my hearing!” one might shout. “Compensate me, dammit, or I’ll sue!”

Despite the shop’s having been featured in numerous men’s weekly magazines, Nikkan Gendai reports such publicity failed to keep Mimi Kaki Club from going under. Just eight months after opening, it tiptoed into oblivion and nobody’s heard so much as a peep from it since. (K.S.)

Source: “Kureemu satto de tsubusareta mimi kaki kurabu,” Nikkan Gendai (Aug. 29, page 28)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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