Lexicon guide for browsing a Japanese adult site

Flash June 3
Flash June 3

Riddled with puns, obscure language and tongue-in-cheek phrases, the typical Japanese adult site can be challenging for even the most astute reader of the language. However, this week The Tokyo Reporter has stumbled upon an article inside a back issue of Flash (June 3, 2008), which provides a quick-and-dirty guide to the adult lexicon.

Chikuchira — short for chikubi chirari (glimpse of nipples). Photos of dressed women that reveal parts of their breasts. Related to panchira (photos revealing panties). Nipple is sometimes playfully written out as chiku-B (district B) or B-chiku (B storage). (Also see Ooguro.)

Esu Efu (SF) — further abbreviated from sefure (sex friend), it means a physical relationship without any particular affection.

Fue — literally flute, a reference to fellatio (which itself is often shortened to fera). Somewhat archaic but still in use are “Ferrari” and shaku (referring to shakuhachi, a Japanese bamboo flute).

Imadori — “shot right now” — using a cell phone camera to shoot and post scenes during, or immediately after, the sex act in real time.

Jidori — literally, a local chicken. To photograph oneself in the nude using a cell phone’s built-in camera or digital camera. Also used to describe photos taken in such a manner. (Also see Miraa.)

Kao-man — word used to describe a photo of a woman that shows both her face (kao) and mons pubis (manko). Related words include kao jiri (made from face and buttocks) and kao pai (face and breasts).

Machikado — candid shots, often of portions of women’s bodies, taken on street corners in everyday situations. Often used as a prefix, such as machikado chichi (in the case of breasts).

Miraa — “mirror.” When photographing oneself (jidori), shooting one’s reflection off a full-length mirror facilitates capturing more area than merely using a camera held away at arm’s length.

Moro — short for moro ni mieru (completely visible). Applied to moro pan (in the case of panties), moro-chichi (breasts), etc. In the case of un-retouched photos, it means images without any mosaic or masking.

Nekomi — nude photo of a woman taken (or made to seem taken) unawares while she is sleeping after sex.

Ni — shortened from onani (masturbation). On sites it is made into a suffix after the name of the female model who is being viewed, e.g., Yuko ni.

Ooguro — large, dark-colored nipples. Often used to refer to pictures of pregnant females. A glimpse of pink nipples is sometimes referred to as sakura chirari (a glimpse of cherry blossoms). (Also see Chikuchira.)

Ori — short for “original,” in reference to photos taken by oneself and posted on a site.

Pansen — edges of panties that are visible through outer garment. Made from panty and sen (line). Also referred to as Suke-san (Ms. Diaphanous) and sometimes using two references to the “Mito Komon” TV series, In-san (Ms. Recluse) and Komon-san (Ms. Anus).

Pochi — protuberant, particularly when referring to nipples that protrude when no bra is worn or through a wet garment. A male whose groin is highlighted would be called pochin.

Rou — shot of butt crack exposed by wearing low-rise jeans. It may also be a shortened form of “panties shot from a low angle.” Variations include JK rou (in the case of a high school student) and rou mama (in the case of a young mother).

Sakasa — meaning “upside down,” refers to a photo shot up a woman’s skirt. It is often preceded by words referring to the type of place of work, such as kangofu sakasa (upskirt shots of a nurse’s underwear).

Sekuusu — An endearing form of the word “sex” (sekkusu), with the middle vowel elongated. Words altered in a similar manner include onanu (from onani, masturbation) and opanchu (panties).

Sho — short for shojo, a virgin. Often combined with JK, JM or JS for high-school, middle-school or primary-school girl.

Sukajiri — peep shot of panties or buttocks of a girl wearing a miniskirt. Many such photos are snapped in everyday situations, such as while a woman is hanging out laundry, shopping, playing with a child in a park, etc.

Tenshi no Hane — literally wings of an angel, it means the flanges of a sanitary napkin that extend beyond the edges of panties.

Uma — “Horse,” shortened to a single character from the three characters kijo-i, the riding (female superior) position. “Doggy style” is shortened to ushiro (back) and the so-called missionary position is simply mae (front).

Source: “Adult site yogo jiten,” Flash (June 3, 2008)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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