Depraved dame loiters at men’s loos in hopes of grabbing a guy to gobble

Shukan Bunshun Dec. 20
Shukan Bunshun Dec. 20
“When I was single, I was really promiscuous. On weekends I’d go to matchmaking parties or drinking establishments, and if I met a guy I liked, I’d take him straight home with me. I really let the good times roll.”

This untrammeled spirit conveys the story of her frequent descents into depravity in the September issue of woman’s erotic fanzine Amour, as reported in Shukan Bunshun (Dec. 20).

“My tried-and-true technique was when I saw a guy I liked head for the loo, I’d follow behind him and wait outside, and as he emerged I’d sway on my heels and mumble, ‘Ohhhh, I’m drunk,’ and pretending to stagger, I’d fall into his arms and kiss him. Trust me, no man alive would turn down an opportunity like that.

“Having become acquainted thusly, there were times when we would consummate our friendship right on the spot, in the toilet. Or we’d head for someplace close by, like in a public park, or in the space between buildings, or on the steps of emergency exits or at underpasses beneath streets. And sometimes things got really flaky, and we’d even do it in the front yards of people’s houses or once, atop the hood of a parked car (giggle).”

For this story’s pseudonymous byline, Bunshun’s editor comes up with chinshutsu-kibotsu, a devilish play on words for shinshutsu-kibotsu — an idiom meaning to pop up elusively in unexpected places and at unexpected moments, but written with characters literally meaning “god appears and the demon vanishes.” Here 神出 (shinshutsu, god appears) is replaced by チン出 (chinshutsu), so as to take on the meaning of “a penis pops out and the devil disappears.” (W.W.)

Source: “Shukujo no zasshi kara,” Shukan Bunshun (Dec. 20, page 101)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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