Sad Sack boss turns out to be capable cocksman

Shukan Bunshun Apr. 5
Shukan Bunshun Apr. 5
“The assistant manager in my section is 40 years old. He’s balding and a little on the chubby side, the type who looks more than his actual age. And recently a colleague of the same age beat him out for a promotion. So he’s not all that appealing, but at a company party maybe because I drank too much I wound up going with him to a hotel.”

Shazam! Here we go with a G-spot jimmying, erotic essay from the February edition of the female reader participatory soft porn mag Ai to Taiken Special Deluxe, as introduced in Shukan Bunshun (Apr. 5).

“Once we got in the room, it was like embracing a chubby bear,” she recalls, “But I thought to myself, well we’ve gone this far, so I might as well go all the way — although I certainly didn’t have high expectations.

“Then we started to do it. He gave me a passionate kiss, began manipulating me in an expert manner, and then — surprise of surprises — his ‘meat pole’ was long and strong and he was an expert at putting it to good use!

“The feeling he gave me was exquisite, and I soon began issuing moans of pleasure. Here I was feeling a little sorry this pudgy middle-aged guy, who was not particularly skilled at his job — or anything else I supposed — but as it turned out, he happened to be a virtuoso at sex, maybe even better at it than anyone I’ve done it with before.

“Since that first encounter, every time it so moves me I try to find some pretext to get him in bed!”

For this week’s bawdy byline, Bunshun’s unpredictable punster delves into an English literary classic to give us “Koman to Henken,” a play on words of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” (Goman to Henken in Japanese). The title is tweaked by changing goman to koman, a slightly archaic word to describe the female reproductive organ, thereby giving the meaning vagina and prejudice. (W.W.)

Source: “Shukujo no zasshi kara,” Shukan Bunshun (Apr. 5, page 126)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

Facebook Comments
Tokyo Style