The Tokyo Reporter

Kinky couple gets it on by letting hubby watch from the sidelines

Shukan Bunshun May 26

“My hubby is really flaky, in that he can’t get it on with me unless he sees me having sex with another man beforehand.”

Thus begins a ribald tale from the April issue of women’s soft porn publication Ai no Taiken Special Deluxe, as introduced on the pages of Shukan Bunshun (May 26).

“Last week I had sex with a man I’d met via a swapping club we belong to,” the woman continues. “We checked into a hotel with twin beds, and while I got into bed and started humping the guy, my husband sat on the other bed and watched us. While looking at us making it in the sack, he began getting a humongous woody.

“Lots of times when we do this, the men will proposition me, when my hubby’s out of earshot, saying ‘Your old man’s a real perv. What do you say we meet up together, just the two of us?’ But if my husband’s not there watching us, I don’t feel anything at all from these guys. After they leave the hotel room, I’ll always say to him, ‘Honey, you’re the best of them all!’ and then when we get it on, the sex is great. The thing is, it’s only good if I ball a another guy beforehand.

“I guess you could say that my having sex with the other man is just our way of engaging in foreplay!”

For this week’s pseudonymous byline, Bunshun’s editor came up with a classic — literally, using the name “Torikaebaya mono ga tachi.” This derives from Torikaebaya Monogatari (“The Changelings”), a tale from the late Heian Period about two siblings who take on the respective mannerisms of the opposite sex — a medieval examination of human sexual roles that was many years ahead of its time. By the brilliant maneuver of shifting the final syllable from “ri” to “chi,” the title is tweaked to mean “If only a change could happen, something would stand up,” a not-so-subtle reference to an erect penis. (W.W.)

Source: “Shukujo no zasshi kara,” Shukan Bunshun (May 26, page 103)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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