The Tokyo Reporter

Insider reveals the secrets of winning a fuzoku femme’s favor

When it comes to scribes who scribble about sex, seniority is certainly significant
In its latest weekly installment of the ongoing memoirs of a veteran writer covering the pink trade, Nikkan Gendai (Nov. 5) suggests that when it comes to scribes who scribble about sex, seniority is certainly significant.

Why? While not citing his source, the writer claims that about 40 percent of female sex industry workers come from broken homes, and of these, a vast majority, perhaps over 80 percent, grew up without a father in the household.

Many, for reasons related to their unfamiliarity with males at home, grew up and had the further misfortune of gravitating to gloomy relationships with disreputable or violent partners.

“Many girls in the business have been hurt or disappointed by men in their own age group,” he explains. “So they tend to seek out older men based on their desire for a sense of security.”

Older men are also better at making conversation and are good at explaining the facts of life in ways that are easy to understand. A working girl is also more likely to feel gratitude when a man doesn’t treat her in a condescending manner.

For these reasons, the writer tells Nikkan Gendai, about one working girl out of five will bend the shop rules and accept his invitation to take a meal together.

Indeed, some of them are emotionally touched by such tender treatment.

“There have even been girls who embraced me in a hug while saying, ‘Daddy,'” he writes. “There’s a strong chance of becoming deeply intimate with such women.”

Of course, in these cases older men are cautioned not to erotically exploit the gal’s Electra complex, as this will make her feel she’s seen as a sex object. So rather than requesting it, it’s best to bide one’s time, nurture the relationship and wait for her to make the first move. (K.S.)

Source: “Ojisan ga tengai deeto ni seiko suru hoho,” Nikkan Gendai (Nov. 5, page 20)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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