Taxi drivers’ tales of taking it out in trade

Jitsuwa Taiho October
Jitsuwa Taiho October
We’ve all heard stories about female passengers who can’t come up with the taxi fare and ask the driver if he’s willing to take it out in trade.

“I’ve heard them too, but I never thought it would ever happen to me,” smiles an unnamed Tokyo cabbie to Jitsuwa Taiho (October).

A kojin (independent driver) was cruising one of the drinking areas after the trains had stopped running and was flagged down by a woman who seemed a bit inebriated. As he cruised toward the designated destination, he heard light snores emanating from the back seat.

Okyakusan, we’ve arrived,” he awakened her politely.

“Ahhhh,” she yawned. “Oh! Oh my goodness; I’ve forgotten my handbag!”

“Oh no…”

She told him she kept no cash in her house either.

“But listen. The fact is, I work in a sex shop. What do you say you come in, and I’ll let you have some ‘service’ — will that be all right?”

“The meter came to about 5,000 yen, which is a bit less than most sex shops. So I figured, how could I possibly go wrong?” the driver says, without providing any further details, alas.

Another driver, age 47, relates this account.

“I was driving a young couple when a huge spat broke out. The woman began claiming that he was cheating on her. She began slanging him and they were really going at it. Then suddenly the guy ordered me to stop and let him get out, and he just strode off angrily!

“The girl started weeping piteously, but then quickly regained control of herself.”

“‘Take me to a love hotel,’ she said. I figured she was bent on getting even with him by sleeping with somebody else: me.”

Now here is where the story gets really flaky.

“While we were in bed going at it, she grabbed her cell phone and called up the guy who’d been in the car, and started telling him what we were doing!

“I tell ya — women can be frightening creatures, ya know??”

Source: “Takushii jomuin no iro-ero-banashi!” Jitsuwa Taiho (October, page 71)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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