Chinese take-out: Mainland visitors revel in Japan’s deri heru delights

Shukan Jitsuwa Sep. 3
Shukan Jitsuwa Sep. 3
“Chinese? No way! They’re nothing but trouble,” scowls the manager of a “delivery health” (out-call sex service) in Tokyo.

But other shops in Tokyo and Osaka are finding male visitors from mainland China to be a growing source of revenues. As reported in Shukan Jitsuwa (Sep. 3), business is booming for the deri heru and so-called “date clubs.”

Whatever else one can say about moral issues, it’s natural that males traveling to another country take an interest in sex, and Chinese are certainly no exception.

Interestingly, it’s extremely rare to see advertisements appealing to such visitors. It appears that those who want to play allow travel agents and their reps to function as the middlemen in such transactions.

“We target the wealthiest segment of Chinese travelers,” says the operator of an Osaka deri heru. “They stay in top-class hotels. Since money is no object for them, the usual charge is 50,000 yen a pop. We offer one type of course, and it’s short-time only. If the woman stays all night, there’s more risk involved.”

Upon further investigation, Shukan Jitsuwa finds that Japanese women are also in high demand at brothels in Shanghai, despite their charging twice the rate of local females. Put it down to historical baggage, or perhaps a secret fascination the members of China’s moneyed class have toward things japonesque.

“If you’re a rich Shanghainese looking for a status symbol, you acquire a Japanese mistress,” says the aforementioned Osaka deriheru boss. “Chinese feel kind of yearning toward Japanese females that a Japanese man might feel toward an American woman, or an Italian. Maybe it’s a subliminal thing, of wanting one because she’s harder to get. Anyway, the moneyed Chinese we deal with cause very little trouble.”

The article ends on a note of concern: could rising demand by these moneyed foreign visitors actually deplete the supply of deri heru dames available for the locals? (K.S.)

Source: “Nihon wa fuzoku tengoku: Chugokujin kankokyaku muke deriheru daiseikyo,” Shukan Jitsuwa (Sep. 3, page 53)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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